• The least known of policy is more political.

    Ensure that, by 2015, children everywhere complete a full course of primary schooling..

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  • FREEDOM IS NOT DEFINITED BY SAFETY

    Achieving an illiteracy rate of 1% for people aged 15 to 24 years. Achieve an increase of 2 in the number of average years of schooling for the population aged 15 to 24 years.

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Need assistance from Obama for America regarding the 2013 campaign.

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Erick Cinquemani. Political Candidate

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Given the cost, the project has been opened to "class sponsoring" from any class willing to pitch in. A class that contributes $100,000 to the project will be recognized at dedication and the memorial will be engraved with the class year (in an out of the way corner that does not detract from the memorial's overall message)., Erick Cinquemani Aenean ultricies mi vitae est. Mauris placerat eleifend leo. Quisque sit amet est et sapien ullamcorper pharetra. Vestibulum erat wisi, condimentum sed.

As many of you know the Class of '67 is spearheading an effort to create a War Memorial on campus. The monument will be dedicated in 2017 to coincide with The Citadel's 175th anniversary. The $1,000,000+ overall project cost will support both construction as well as the creation of an endowment to maintain the memorial’s upkeep in perpetuity.

Health

  1. Ensuring environmental sustainability
  2. Develop a global partnership for development
  3. Promote gender equality and empower women.
  4. Reduce child mortality
  5. Improve maternal health
  6. Combat malaria and other diseases.

Education

  1. Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger
  2. Achieve universal primary education
  3. Promote gender equality and empower women.
  4. Reduce child mortality
  5. Improve maternal health
  6. Combat malaria and other diseases.
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On June 25, two states overturned bans on same-sex marriage. That's how quickly progress is happening. In Indiana, U.S. District Judge Richard Young ruled that the state ban on same-sex marriage enacted in 2004 is unconstitutional. Within minutes of the ruling, Marion County Clerk Beth White in Indianapolis issued a statement saying her office would immediately begin issuing licenses. The Indiana ruling may face more hurdles—Indiana's Attorney General has filed an appeal—but that did not stop hundreds of couples from taking their vows of love.

Less than an hour after the decision in Indiana, another monumental ruling came from out West. The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals moved to strike down Utah’s 2004 ban on same-sex marriage. And it's not just Utah—the ruling affects five other states over which the 10th Circuit presides: Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Kansas, and Oklahoma. That's huge. The court stayed its own decision to wait for the Supreme Court to rule before marriages begin, but the weight of the ruling was perhaps best summed up by University of Utah Law Professor and Equality Utah Board Member Clifford Rosy who called the ruling, “the biggest victory in the history of the gay rights movement. A federal appeals court has recognized that same sex couples have the same freedom to marry, establish a family and raise children together as all Americans do.”

On June 25, two states overturned bans on same-sex marriage. That's how quickly progress is happening. In Indiana, U.S. District Judge Richard Young ruled that the state ban on same-sex marriage enacted in 2004 is unconstitutional. Within minutes of the ruling, Marion County Clerk Beth White in Indianapolis issued a statement saying her office would immediately begin issuing licenses. The Indiana ruling may face more hurdles—Indiana's Attorney General has filed an appeal—but that did not stop hundreds of couples from taking their vows of love.

Less than an hour after the decision in Indiana, another monumental ruling came from out West. The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals moved to strike down Utah’s 2004 ban on same-sex marriage. And it's not just Utah—the ruling affects five other states over which the 10th Circuit presides: Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Kansas, and Oklahoma. That's huge. The court stayed its own decision to wait for the Supreme Court to rule before marriages begin, but the weight of the ruling was perhaps best summed up by University of Utah Law Professor and Equality Utah Board Member Clifford Rosy who called the ruling, “the biggest victory in the history of the gay rights movement. A federal appeals court has recognized that same sex couples have the same freedom to marry, establish a family and raise children together as all Americans do.”